Full portraits,

The years 1958-1960 were the most prolific. Vieitez made numerous full portraits that often were sent to people who had drifted from the poor Galician coutryside. Emigration explains why Vieitez’s photographs are often full of the absence of relatives and mostly show children, women and old people. It explains strange objects, too, such as the photograph showing an old woman with her radio who proves to her son that she used the money he sent her from abroad properly. Photography is then, in a familial circle, a means of communication.

See this collection


Passport photographs,

Vieitez made hundreds of passport photographs when the ID card became compulsory in 1962. The subject was put in front of a white sheet and, to avoid deformations due to his non-professional material, Vieitez had to keep quite a distance from his models. It was then impossible for him to focus on the faces. That’s why they offer much more information than a basic passport photograph and can be considered staged portraits.

See this collection


Daily life,

Vieitez documented the different episodes, either solemn or common, of the daily life in his countryside. Nevertheless, it’s hard to speak of reporting. These photographs are, instead, portraits. Everybody is very conscious of the presence of the photographer who controls the scene. Most of all, his aim was not to steal photos but to produce photo-souvenirs to sell to clients.

See this collection